Developer Buys Historic Nundah Queenslander at Auction

Photo credit: www.realestate.com.au

A historic Nundah Queenslander heritage home located at 79 Bage Street went under the gavel and was sold to an unnamed buyer, a “local developer” who bought it for $2.55 million. One question remains unanswered. “What will happen to the heritage home?” The identity of the local developer and his plans for the property have not been revealed.

 

The Heritage Home


 


The heritage home’s front
(Photo credit: www.realestate.com.au)

The historic Nundah heritage home was believed to have been built in 1924. The property sits on over 1,630 square metres, which is an impressive four blocks.

Inside the historic home
(Photo credit: www.realestate.com.au)

The house still has its original gaslight fittings and pressed metal ceilings. It has remained in the hands of a single family since it was built, but went up for sale when the last family member passed away.

Local Resources

 

Tower Ad

Auction Day

The heritage home went into auction with a total of 23 registered bidders. Its quadruple block location, covered by several titles, has inspired lively competition among bidders. With a starting bid of $1.2 million among 17 active bidders, the bidding rapidly increased to $2 million. The frenzied bidding eventually settled down to a final bid of $2.55 million, made by an anonymous local developer who eventually clinched the deal.

 

Worried Locals

Lots of space for possible development (Photo credit: www.realestate.com.au)

By refusing to be identified, the local developer has introduced an air of mystery concerning the fate of the heritage home. With the property covering such big, prime space, many things are possible.

Numerous residents of Nundah are not happy about the prospect of a major development in the area as a result of this sale. The locals are worried about the continuous removal of heritage homes in the northside communities and throughout Brisbane. One-by-one, antique and historic homes and properties are being developed into commercialised, modern structures.

Numerous Nundah residents are not happy about the prospect of a major development in the area as a result of this sale. The locals are worried about the continuous removal of heritage homes in the northside communities and throughout Brisbane. One-by-one, antique and historic homes and properties are being developed into commercialised, modern structures.

Nundah residents, particularly people whose families have been in the area for generations, feel that they are losing their heritage with what they consider to be “unnecessary” improvements in their community.

Similar appeals in other communities such as Coorparoo and New Farm are being made to save houses that they perceive should be on the heritage list and stop rampant commercial development in heritage sites.

“What will happen to this Nundah heritage home?” At this point, without further information from the developer who is keeping his cards close to his chest, only time will tell.